Notes from Leadership Advanced Milwaukee: How Nonprofits Balance Service and Advocacy

Recently, my colleague Steve Zimmerman of Spectrum Nonprofit Services and I led a session for Leadership Advanced Milwaukee on Balancing Service and Advocacy. To recap, Leadership Advanced is a cohort-based, peer-centered, professional development program. How does the program work to strengthen nonprofit leaders and create stronger communities? Check out the new Leadership Advanced Overview video.

Why Nonprofits Need to Advocate

According to the research presented in Forces for Good on the six practices of high impact nonprofits, advocacy is one of the six practices of high impact nonprofits.  Conducting programs on the ground help meet the immediate needs of constituents as well as inform the system-level reform necessary to create long-term sustainable solutions.  Advocacy in this context is used to identify changes in public behavior, laws and public policy.

Many practitioners and board members in the nonprofit sector believe that advocacy is forbidden by the IRS regulations and that nonprofits are walking a slippery slope if they venture into this arena.  Well before we even go there, why should nonprofits pursue advocacy?

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What Crutchfield and McLeod Grant state is that there is a virtuous cycle between service and advocacy.  What organizations learn from delivering direct service programs informs what is needed to improve conditions for better outcomes for constituents.  Direct service also offers channels for implementing innovative solutions.  With this knowledge, organizations are well positioned to advocate for legislation, funding and raise visibility of the importance of their causes for public benefit.

Advocacy is not Lobbying

The term advocacy often conjures a vision of lobbying.  Lobbying is a very small slice of the advocacy pie.  There are many other approaches to advocacy that don’t include influencing elected officials regarding a specific piece of legislation.  These approaches include: civic engagement (involving others in your mission); information advocacy (providing analysis of an issue); and lobbying lite (talking about issues not legislation with public officials).

Approaches to Advocacy

In our Leadership Advanced Milwaukee session, we asked whether any of the organizations represented in the group conducted advocacy activities. Three of the eleven participants acknowledged that their organizations did conduct formal advocacy activities.  Interestingly, these three organizations represented the various approaches to arrive at balancing service and advocacy.  One organization started with advocacy as its primary focus and later added direct service programs to fill a need for services.  Another organization started with direct service and recognized the importance of a voice for their cause.  The third organization began with both direct service programs and advocacy activities.

At one point in my career, I held a position as Marketing and Communications Director for a statewide advocacy organization for children and families.  Every day, I was providing information and education regarding various policies and practices that affected children and families in New Mexico. We developed campaigns to inform the public about various pieces of legislation that would negatively impact those citizens that can’t vote, children.

Only once did I need to register as a lobbyist and that was when we were engaged in the drafting of a specific piece of legislation to create a youth development fund.  In that circumstance, my time was focused exclusively on that effort, to influence policy makers and elected officials.

Before you dismiss advocacy as something your organization “can’t do” check the IRS guidelines.  An organization with a budget of $500,000 annually can legally spend $100,000 on lobbying without jeopardizing its nonprofit tax-exempt status.

How Does Your Nonprofit Advocate?

Does your organization participate in advocacy activities? Leave a comment below describing your approach. If not, think about the impact you want to make with your services. What changes in the environment would increase that impact? Those barriers to increasing impact are the place to start with advocacy activities.

Reaching the Summit with Girls on the Run

Recently I partnered with Forward Community Investments and Girls on the Run of Dane County to present a case study on capacity building and strategy development at the Girls on the Run Summit in San Antonio, TX.  We had more than 85 participants interested in learning about how to build capacity and think strategically to chart the future path of their councils.

The 2014 Girls on the Run (GOTR) Summitt. From left to right: Dennis Johnson, VP of Advisory Services of Forward Community Investments, Sara Pickard, Executive Director, GOTR of Dane County, Mary Stelletello, Principal, Vista Global Coaching & Consulting, and Mindi Giftos, Board Chair, GOTR of Dane County.
The 2014 Girls on the Run (GOTR) Summit. Dennis Johnson, VP of Advisory Services, Forward Community Investments, Mindi Giftos, Board Chair, GOTR of Dane County, Mary Stelletello, Principal, Vista Global Coaching & Consulting, and Sara Pickard, Executive Director, GOTR of Dane County.

It was wonderful to work with Girls on the Run because their vision so strongly aligns with my own personal values:  “A world where every girl knows and activates her limitless potential and is free to boldly pursue her dreams.”

The 2014 Girls on the Run Summit kicked-off in San Antonio, Texas.
The 2014 Girls on the Run Summit kicked-off in San Antonio, Texas.

Are you interested in reaching your limitless potential and boldly pursuing your dreams?  Let’s talk about how coaching can help you.

Or maybe your nonprofit organization is launching a strategic planning or capacity building initiative? Contact me today! I look forward to helping your organization reach the summit.

Is Your Organization Leaderful?

I’m excited to lead a discussion on Leadership Succession Planning for Wegner CPAs Nonprofit Roundtable, in Milwaukee on October 15, and the subject of succession planning has led me to reflect on my past experience as an executive director of five different nonprofits.

Unsurprisingly, not one of those organizations had a succession plan in place before I departed.  In one instance, a successor was named before I departed. In another, I was able to help identify an interim executive director before leaving.

In all of these situations, my departure was disruptive for the organization, not because I wasn’t replaceable, but because change in leadership is disruptive. Having a plan in place would have lessened that disruption.

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CompassPoint Nonprofit Services has published many resources on Executive Transition and I have found “Building Leaderful Organizations: Succession Planning for Nonprofits”  to be a very informative guide to preparing for the inevitable…leadership transition!

Tim Wolfred cites three types of succession plans:

1.    Strategic Leader Development

2.    Emergency Succession

3.    Departure-defined Succession

Each of these approaches start with building leadership within the organization. Disruption is minimized when successors come from within the organization.  Here are some key questions to gauge how prepared your organization is for leadership transition:

1.    Does your organization have a strategic plan that includes staff leadership development?

2.    Is the board evaluating the executive annually? Does it understand the scope of the position?

3.    Do the executive director direct reports receive evaluations and are they solidly performing?

4.    Is the top management team high performing and capable to lead the organization in the absence of the executive?

5.    Are key external relationships shared beyond the executive – with either another staff person or board member?

6.    Do the organizational financial systems meet industry standards and are reports generated regularly for board and staff?

7.    Do operating manuals and personnel policies exist? Are they easily accessible and up to date?

8.    Have top program staff documented key duties in writing and identified another staff person to assume duties in an emergency?

If you answered  “yes” to all of these questions, you are miles ahead of the majority of nonprofits. You can then focus on building the leadership throughout your organization through targeted professional development plans and documented emergency succession plans. If you answered “no” to any of these questions, you have a place to start to build the organization’s capacity for transition.

Don’t wait until you or your Executive Director have one foot out the door.  Your organization will be in much better shape if you plan for the transition.  That is the type of legacy all leaders want to leave.

What advice do you have for nonprofits facing a leadership transition?

Is Your Organization Built to Last?

Recently I partnered with Forward Community Investments in hosting a webinar on organizational capacity building and strategy development.  In this time of constant change, nonprofit organizations need to think about building capacity to remain relevant in the field in which they operate.

800px-Cairo,_Gizeh,_Pyramids_of_Kephren_and_Khufu,_Egypt,_Oct_2004What are the key steps to building your organization to last?

1. Assess current organizational capacity.

Capacity refers to intentional, coordinated and mission-driven efforts aimed at strengthening the management and governance of nonprofits to improve performance and impact.

2. Start at the top.

Focus on your organization’s mission and vision.

3. Know Thyself.

Analyze your organization’s business model; focus on geography, customers, programs, and funding.

4. Know the market.

Your organization doesn’t exist in a vacuum.  Map out where you operate and who you compete with.  What trends will impact your organization?

5. Build on your strengths.

What differentiates your organization from others in your market? What makes you unique? Build on that.

6. Make decision-making explicit.

Identify criteria for testing strategic options. Create a structure for discussion with board and staff.

7. Develop strategies to answer the biggest questions.

What are the most important questions facing your organization right now?  Draft strategies that answer each question.

8. Develop implementation plan.

You’ve defined the big questions facing your organization and created strategies to address those questions.  The last step is bringing strategy to life.  Document how you will implement the strategies that will build an organization to last.

Check out the webinar.  Or if you want to chat about building your organization to last, Contact me today to get started!